Patan Travel Guide

Home>>Asia>>Nepal>> Patan Travel Guide

Patan, officially Lalitpur Sub-Metropolitan City, is one of the major cities of Nepal located in the south-central part of Kathmandu Valley.

Patan
Patan

Patan is also known as Manigal. It is best known for its rich cultural heritage, particularly its tradition of arts and crafts. It is called city of festival and feast, fine ancient art, making of metallic and stone carving statue. At the time of the 2011 Nepal census it had a population of 226,728 in 54,748 individual households.

Patan
Patan

Durbar Square is the Palace Square of Patan. Approaching the square from the south end you have the palace on your right and a series of temples on your left. Admission to the area for foreigners is Rs500 (with exception to residents of SAARC countries which should pay Rs100). You are trusted to pay this at a booth at the south end of Durbar Square or at another entrance to the area further to the north as there is no formal ticket control.

Patan
Patan

The Palace was built on the site of a fort that stood until 1734 and served as the residence of the Malla rulers of the then Patan state. It is divided up into a succession of courtyards. Unfortunately only the last of these on the right (which houses the museum) is open on a regular basis, due to problems with theft of artifacts. Try peering through cracks in the doors to see what you are missing! The first palace building is Sundari Chowk which was constructed in 1647.

Patan
Patan

The three-storey temple on the palace side is the Degutale temple, constructed in 1661 after an earlier one burned down. Mul Chowk was the central part of the old palace and in recent times has suffered much theft of ornamental woodwork.

Patan
Patan

The Museum is in Keshab Narayan Chowk. (Admission to the courtyard is free; entrance fee for the museum is R250. Hours 10.30 to 17.30). An excellent and well-presented little museum with descriptions of various artistic techniques.

2